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Ballyroon Mountain - History
sunset from ballyroon
© 2012 ballyroonmountain.com

 

 

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We've lived here since May 2004; until the sixties it belonged to a local family, whose relatives still live nearby.

Several farmers remember herding cattle and cutting hay from the drier meadows here in their younger days. It was bought in the sixties by an American.

At this time a car, or even a tractor, on the peninsula was a rare sight; the route to Ballyroon Mountain was unsuitable for motor vehicles, most farms were self-sufficient for their simple needs.

In Kilcrohane the Co-op and an enterprising parish priest helped to build up a flourishing butter collective, early daffodils and new potatoes were sent by train from Bantry to Cork and Dublin.

Many sons and daughters left for work in USA and UK, leaving their parents or a sibling to keep the farm going.

The American family stayed here until the 70's, after which a German family used it as a holiday home for the next twenty-five years.

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Going back further is a matter of conjecture, but here are some things we have found so far:

Amanda Clarke's website www.sheepsheadplaces.net is a grand resource for the area. The history of Sheep's Head Peninsula is documented in the "A Guide To The Sheep's Head Way" walk guidebook. There are other books on Bantry Bay and South West Cork, and local museum collections in Bantry and Bantry House. The Famine Heritage Centre in Skibereen documents the suffering of this tragedy, West Cork was one of the worst affected parts of Ireland.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

00353 (0)27 67940 - info@ballyroonmountain.com